Thursday, April 19, 2018

Jilted (负心的人), Tang Lan Hua (汤兰花), Quests EP

Jilted (负心的人- literal: an ungrateful man) has been covered by numerous artistes. The song is a delectable piece of musical composition. Chinese recording companies had been exploiting it for its popularity and there were many pirated versions made, especially with a classic that could sell.

I happened to have one copy, bought from Sungei Road (a dear-departed flea market). It was difficult to keep track of a vinyl that had been in cold storage for many years but here's some information.
Released in 1968, the song with its memorable tune was recorded by Taiwanese lady singer Tang Lan Hua (汤兰花) and composed by Li Jun (李翊君). She sang only this one number on the soundtrack of the movie.  With it, she became an overnight celebrity as the music and message connected with lovers all over Asia. 

In Singapore, many nightclubs, usually patronised by Chinese businessmen would play this melody.  There were other versions of the original lyrics but the title theme and melody remained unchanged. 

Apparently, it was recorded in many languages with even a Cambodian translation. The origin of this song is Japanese and the version provided by FB friend, Hiroshi Deguchi has been posted below.
The original version of Jilted (负心的人), theme song by ROC. Thank you.

Throughout the years, upbeat and brighter versions were recorded. Huang Ching Ren covered it with a host of other Chinese singers.  Female songstress Sammi Kao and a few others did a more upbeat recording. 

The Quests made it a hit with an instrumental rendition, together with, Tears (), Flower Of Tears (源的小花) and My Lost Dream (尋夢的人), on an EP (image).  

The movie itself was the talk of the town and shown for weeks at the cinemas in town. Like other movies those years with romantic images of young couples and sweet surrender, the Asian circuit of pop music had similar traits with Western shows. Tear-jerking movies, especially in the 60's sold like char kway teow.

An original article by A Lim.
The Quests instrumental version of, Jilted (负心的人) which became a hit too.
YouTube Video by eosyeo.

From Facebook Friend Hiroshi Deguchi. Thank you, Hiroshi:

"This is the original Onna No Taneiki sung by Mori Shinnichi. He once lived in the same city as I do now. His former classmate in his high school days said he kept singing and singing on the bus during their school trip and never gave the microphone away.


This is the original 'Onna No Taneiki' sung by Mori Shinnichi in Japanese. Video from lu Lulu.

Mori Shinnichi comes from a poor family and was brought up by his mother. He is very considerate of his brothers and sisters because the family had to endure during their younger days. He sent his younger brother to medical school which qualified him as a doctor. 

I think his best song is Erimo Misaki."
Ms Tang Lan Hua (汤兰花)
At 17 years, because of her exotic beauty and a good voice, her teacher suggested that she took part in a singing competition. She won the championship and was selected to act and sing the theme song in the movie, The Ungrateful Person.

Images: Google
Videos: YouTube.

21 comments:

prickofdeath said...

Many thanks for this! I have been looking for the singer and album for a long time, so am very grateful for your blog post

Stephen Han said...

Yes I do and I saw the movie too.

STEPHEN HAN FB said...

The song was lovely and Tang LAN Huais pretty

PETER CHEONG said...

I saw it at Oriental Theater when courting my wife in '70. End of the show I saw many ladies wif teary eyes. Sad ending movie.

Thk u Andy, for the recall. This ep has been in cold storage. I kept for a sentimental reason. My first movie wif my wife. Not sure if is pirated.

Thks for the memories.

ANDY: Pop Music Not Pills. © said...

Thanks, Peter, the one I have is under FORMOSA RECORD and I'm not certain if that's a pirate label. EP 746. If anyone can help? Certainly brings back some nostalgia, which is one of the objectives🙏 of my blog.

Hiroshi Deguchi has provided more information about the song and its Japanese singer. I have just posted it on the blog. Thanks, Hiroshi for sharing and all FB friends for your interest.

FREDDIE KANG (THUNDERBIRDS) said...

My late cousin Peter Richards was the keyboardist on that album with Sam Toh bassist...
That was The Kelong Days @The Cathay.

FACEBOOK said...


ALL THESE FRIENDS BELOW, THANKS THAT YOU LIKE THE POST
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Tan Ser Kiong
Peter Cheong

POD said...

Many thanks for this! I have been looking for the singer and album for a long time, so am very grateful for your blog post.

SPYeo said...

If I am not mistaken the original singer of this song Jilted is Yao Su Rong. She is aka Queen of Tears Because of her melancholic vocal tone, she was very apt to singing sad and sorrowful songs.In fact, her albums comprise mostly sand and sorrowful songs.

Love making is woman's greatest hazard. If she overcomes the difficulties, her life will be radiant. But if she fails, her life is enduring misery." Dr Marion Hillary.

How right and true it is!

ANDY: Pop Music Not Pills. © said...

Thanks Mr Yeo. I didn't know. I was also told by a Japanese friend from Facebook that the original tune is from a Japanese composer. Interesting. Your research is great, far-reaching.

SPYeo said...

Your Japanese friend could be right about the musical composition. We must not forget that Taiwan had been controlled by the Japanese for about half a century. Literally, I believe their culture, traditions and education and language would have also been affected or tweaked. If one analyses the Taiwanese songs of the 1900's they had been influenced greatly by the Japanese music, tempo, tune and melody.

ANDY: Pop Music Not Pills. © said...

Again thanks, Mr Yeo. There's a huge Museum of Culture in Taipei where one section provides a history of their music. Without the language background, it's been a bit of a setback for me to read and learn about Chinese pops and other Asian cultures from our area.

Perhaps the ASEAN group of countries could look at this aspect and provide some historical background as to their individual music.

Thanks to the other contributors of this post. The postings and music were all done within one day, and now in the evening, a reasonable group of people have provided some nostalgia, valuable answers and information to this particular song which, again, I had learnt from my mother.

FL said...

Andy, I watched this movie, The Jilted, at the demolished King's cinema at Kim Tian Rd. I think it was in 1969. Can't recall the exact year. King cinema I recall showed movies after the completed screening of the new movies in premier or top cinemas like Lido, Capitol, Odeon, Sky, etc.in those heydays. During those years, when the radio or Redifusion played very popular songs from movies. people were curious and headed to cinemas to watch the singers sing the songs in the movies, myself included. Hahaha! We didn't have the benefit of the internet of today then!

ANDY: Pop Music Not Pills. © said...

Hi FL,

Yes, you're right. The habit was to listen to a song on the radio/Rediffusion, then rush to the cinema to watch the singer. My cinema was the Queens or Roxy, where movies played second-run. Cheaper too.

Your support of blog postings is immediate. I can only say a big thank you for your quick reaction and kindly support. 🙏 🙏 🙏

FABIAN FOO (CAMERA HOBBYIST FOR POP BANDS) said...

Saw the movie. Yes, the song is very well known. Still popular in KTV rooms with the elderly singers.

ANDY: Pop Music Not Pills. © said...

Thanks, Fabian. I thought you are a fan of Chinese songs too. Versatility is the keyword. You must be a karaoke singer too.

Again, KAM-SIAH for supporting this blog and its contents.🙏 🙏 🙏

ANUAR ABUZAR (BRUNEI) said...

i saw this movie

ANDY: Pop Music Not Pills. © said...

Yes? You did? That's wonderful. I used to watch Malay and Hindi movies. Culturally the 21st Century is so different now? Or still similar? Thank you, Anuar.

FACEBOOK said...

Thanks, guys for post support.

Jimmy PresLee
Herman S K Lee
Anuar Abuzar
Tony Foo
David Ng

Siew Peter said...

Thanks for posting this great song ! Wonderful memories for those born in the 1950's. We don't have the luxury of what our children have nowadays; listening from iPODs, Smart phone MP4 downloads; but we heard this song over and over again daily from the Reddifusion. Did heard one version sung by Yang Yen; beautifully delivered !.

SIEW Peter

ANDY: Pop Music Not Pills. © said...

Thanks Peter for visiting and reading my blog.

Truly appreciate. Please visit again when you are free.