SINGAPORE 60's: ANDY's POP MUSIC INFLUENCE IS MY PERSONAL MUSIC AND MEMORY TRAIL. PICTURES TELL STORIES BUT I DO NOT OWN THE RIGHTS TO YOU TUBE VIDEOS, AUDIO TRACKS OR IMAGES. THEY HAVE BEEN UPLOADED FOR EDUCATIONAL AND ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES SO INFORM ME IF COPYRIGHTED AND THEY WILL BE DELETED. ANDY LIM (NOVEMBER, 2008).

Saturday, December 06, 2008

National Theatre Singapore 60s & Other Venues


The National Theater, Singapore, was one of the the places where it all happened and when guitars, singers and audiences screamed in unison.

This blog is a place to reminisce and contribute photographs. One of the objectives is to show what happened during our rock n roll days at the:

(a) West Point in Pasir Panjang,
(b) Ambassador Hotel roof garden at Amber Road,
(c) Palace Cinema at East Coast Road,
(d) Celestial Room at Orchard Road,
(e) Rosee D'or beside Scotts Road,

(f) Golden Venus at Orchard Road,
(g) Paya Lebar Airport night club,
(h) Ocean Park Hotel night club at East Coast Road,

(i) St John's Ambulance Brigade Hall at Beach Road,
(j) Singapore Badminton Hall at Guillemard Road

(k) Victoria Memorial Hall at Stamford Road
(l)  Frazer and Neave Hall at Kim Seng Road.
other dance floors and stages where our bands brought the ceilings down!


"The National Theater (add on/4th August, 2010)

A landmark for the performing arts. 


From the 1960's to the 1980's, the performing arts here were synonymous with the National Theater, a local landmark in its heyday.Situated at Fort Canning Park in River Valley Road, the 3,420-seat theater was the biggest performance venue in Singapore then, and had a revolving stage.


By the people, for the people:

It was dubbed 'the people's theater because Singaporeans from all walks of life had contributed to its construction.The plan to build a theater to commemorate Singapore's self-governance was announced in 1959. A year later, then culture minister S. Rajaratnam urged every citizen to contribute to the theater fund in a dollar-a-brick campaign.Donations poured in from all sectors - besides cultural associations and trade unions, the man in the street contributed as well.


Shopkeepers, hawkers and labourers pooled their money, while schoolchildren broke their piggy banks - all to help build the theater. A total of $850,000 was raised for the $2.2 million building, which was officially opened on Aug 8, 1963 for the South-east Asian Cultural Festival. Plagued by problems:

However, the fanfare over the theater soon gave way to criticism. Audiences complained that the open-air venue was impractical, letting rain and surrounding traffic noise in. It was also home to insects and birds, hardly ideal companions during a classical music concert.More than 20 years after it had opened, a team of engineers found the theater structurally unstable. Its 150,000 kg steel cantilever roof, suspended without pillars, needed reinforcements.


But renovating and enclosing the theater would mean parting with at least $12 million, a cost that was deemed too steep.Plans for an extension of the Central Expressway next to the building further stacked the odds against its survival.The theater had its last curtain call after an Indian musical on Jan 15, 1984 and was demolished two years later, despite pleas for its retention from sentimental Singaporeans."

Information from:


(I couldn't find the author's name, so wherever you are, if you read this, please allow me to acknowledge your article above by providing me your name. Thank you.)

2 comments:

rogerpoh said...

Excellent idea. Hope those of you with photos will share them with us. Nice to look back to yesteryear.

Andy Young* said...

Thanks Roger for supporting this blog. Hopefully if you have pictures please send them in too.
Andy